Five Arizona Title Lenders Sued

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Five loan companies in Arizona have been sued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) for failing to follow disclosure guidelines in online advertisements. Guidelines state that lenders must follow specific formats for disclosing any interest rate changes in online marketing. The five lenders, which make loans secured by the borrower’s car title, did not include information related to the APR of their loans.

Named in lawsuits by the CFPB, the five companies are Interstate Lending, Auto Cash Leasing, Phoenix Title Loans, Presto Auto Loans, and Oasis Title Loans. Allegations against the companies state that the listed rates in the advertisements were lower than those borrowers would be given.

All the loans offered by …

Your Low Credit Score Could Cost You Thousand$ On Your Car Loan

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Your credit score is one of the most important variables that lenders use to assess your risk. A low credit score can disqualify you for an auto loan, or force you to pay higher interest rates – but how much will higher interest rates cost you in the long run? New data from Experian shows just how much a poor credit score can cost you over time.

As of the second quarter of 2018, Experian shows a 5.76% average interest rate for new car loans – not far above the 4.45% average rate for prime borrowers with credit scores between 661 and 780, or the 3.47% average rate of super-prime borrowers with credit scores above 781. Non-prime borrowers with credit scores between 601 and 660 are charged an average 7.55% interest rate for new car loans.

However, the penalty for lower credit scores is significant. Subprime borrowers (501-600 credit score) pay 12.14% interest on average, and deep subprime borrowers (300-500 credit score) pay a whopping 14.93% on average for their au…

Don’t Catch Sexually Transmitted Debt!

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“I picked up a really bad case of debt from my ex, and I can’t get rid of it.”

You can pick up several unpleasant surprises from a sexual partner, but have you considered painful, lasting financial ramifications? According to a recent survey from Finder.com, around 74 million Americans have picked up a “sexually transmitted debt,” a debt that’s assumed as part of a relationship.

The study determined that the average sexually transmitted debt (STD) works out to $11,485, with most acquired through marriage (28%) or in a divorce settlement (14%). In some states, the IRS says debt taken on by either spouse after the wedding is automatically a shared debt. The remaining reasons in the top five all relate to spending. Purchases made in a partner’s name account were cited in 25% of the cases, while joint account purchases were cited in 20% of the cases – and the dreaded secret …

5 Ways To Reduce The Cost Of Your Car

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By Haden Kirkpatrick, Esurance Head of Marketing Strategy and Innovation

Despite the majority of cars being parked 90 percent of the time, cars are the second biggest expense in the average American’s budget. Aside from the actual purchase of the vehicle, owners also must pay for maintenance, insurance, repairs, gas, and cleaning costs. And don’t forget parking!

If you’re looking to cut your spending, we’ve got you covered with this list of tips to slash some of the major auto costs and keep more money in your pocket.

1. Buy or Lease a Pre-Owned Vehicle

In 2018, the average cost of a new car is $31,455. That’s plenty for an asset that loses value as soon as you drive it off the lot.

Buying a pre-owned car can save you tens of thousands of dollars. This consumer report breaks down some of the best use…

Car Leasing 101

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So, you are in the market for a new vehicle, huh? You’ve got some important decisions to make. New or used? Coupe or sedan? Import or domestic? Fire engine red or metallic silver?

But perhaps your most important decision, at least from a financial standpoint, is how you will pay for the vehicle. You have three main options: pay the full vehicle price in cash, borrow money to pay for the vehicle, or lease the vehicle.

About one out of every four new vehicles that is sold today is leased, according to Edmunds.com. So, while leasing is popular, most car buyers still prefer to pay cash for their vehicles or finance them. To decide which option is right for you, you need to understand the details and nuances of each.

Paying In Cash and Vehicle Financing

From a pure cost standpoint, paying in full without financing may be the smartest option — if

Nearly Half Of Millennials Feel Held Back By Credit Score

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Is a bad credit score dragging you down? Almost half of millennials (46%) feel that way, according to a new survey conducted by OppLoans.

It’s an understandable feeling, given that millennials came of age during one of the worst recessions in decades. Many millennials emerged from the recession with delayed careers or lower-than-expected earnings and burdened with excessive student loan debt before they even started.

As a result, millennials tend to have lower average credit scores. According to Experian, millennials had an average VantageScore of 638 in 2017 – well below the overall average score of 675. In the previous year, TransUnion found that 43% of millennials had scores considered to be subprime.

The ripple effects of bad credit are reflected in many of the survey results. One-quarter of millennials claim that poor credit adversely affected their housing opportunities, while 14% of millennials continue to live with roommates because bad …

5 Spending Habits That Won’t Rebuild Your Credit

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When your credit score is down, it takes great effort to rebuild it. You have to take care to pay down your debts and get your finances in order. You may also have to change some of your spending habits to have the greatest impact. Consider these five spending habits that will retard your credit rebuilding efforts.

1. Paying Cash

Arguably, it is responsible behavior to pay your bills with cash but using cash does not give lenders any way to assess your creditworthiness. There is no payback to monitor because there is no lending involved.

As Millennial Money Expert Stefanie O’Connell notes: “If you are not borrowing money and you have no history of borrowing money, then you have no credit. That means not being able to be approved for the mortgage or the auto loan or the personal loan… whatever it is in the future.”

2. Using Debit Cards or Prepaid Cards

The same principle applies here as it does with…

How Car Shopping Can Lower Your Credit Score

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Congratulations! Your shopping has paid off and you’ve finally found an excellent car at a reasonable price. Now, how do you plan to pay for it?

Dealers will be happy to arrange financing for you. Simply fill out and sign a loan application, and the Finance and Insurance (F&I) manager will immediately begin searching their lender network to find the best deal for you.

Unfortunately, dealers may submit your information to several lenders to acquire that deal – a method known as “shotgunning” – and that has the potential to lower your credit score.

Each lender will run a credit check to see if you qualify for the loan. These checks are more extensive “hard pulls” that slightly drop your credit score – typically less than five points unless you have other risk factors. A high number of hard pulls can give lenders the impression that you’re rapidly expanding your credit, making you a risk in their eyes.

Most scoring systems allow f…

Seniors And Affordable Transportation

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By Eric Olsen, Executive Director HELPS Nonprofit Law Firm

Affordable transportation is often a concern for senior citizens. Some seniors go without basics to make car payments they can’t afford for a car with little or no equity. Others need affordable replacement transportation but don’t have the income to finance a car. What are some options for these seniors?

I am the Executive Director of HELPS, a national charitable nonprofit law firm that educates lower-income seniors on how to maintain their financial independence. We regularly speak with seniors searching for answers to transportation problems. First let’s discuss options for buying a car, then what to do if you have an existing car payment you can’t afford.

Financing a car from a dealer might not be the best option or even possible for a senior with lower income. Dealers generally sell used cars “as …