5 Tips For Saving Money In College

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By Roshni Chowdhry, head of customer experience at SafetyNet

Of the 17 million Americans currently enrolled in college, 74 percent qualify as what we used to call “nontraditional” students:

  • One in five is 30 years or older.
  • About half don’t rely on their parents for money.
  • One quarter are caring for a child.
  • 47 percent attend college part time at some point.
  • 25 percent took a year off between high school and college.
  • 44 percent have parents without a bachelor’s degree.

In other words, if you’re a college student today, there’s a good chance you’re not the Hollywood stereotype of an 18-year-old on your own for the first time. Still, whether it’s your first year of indepe…

Would You Share Your Driving Data To Save Money?

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By Stephanie Braun, Director of Auto Product Management at Esurance

Companies have collected data on their customers for decades. It allows them to offer more tailored services and products, and provide more relevant messaging. The reason data collection has gotten so much press lately is because it’s reached unprecedented levels. Already, we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data each day. In fact, 90 percent of the world’s entire data reservoir was only created in the last two years. Automated technology like the self-driving car is expected to accelerate the quantity and quality of data that’s collected — perhaps exponentially.

Autonomous vehicles rely on real-time data collection to avoid accidents on the road and ensure engine performance. The suite of sensors and s…

4 Out Of 5 Americans Lie For Money

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Have you ever lied for financial gain? The odds are strong that you’ve done it at least once. According to a new study from finder.com, almost 4 out of 5 Americans have admitted to lying for some type of financial gain – and many don’t feel guilty about their lies.

Over 2,000 U.S. adults were asked if they had committed any of the financial lies presented in a list, from the illegal to the merely unethical. A surprising 78% of respondents admitted to at least one of the transgressions. Assuming a random sample, the study implies that almost 193 million American adults have lied for financial gain at some point in their lives.

Over half of respondents had lied in two specific areas – pocketing found money that wasn’t theirs (56%) and accepting an undercharge or excess change without bringing it to a seller’s attention (52%).

Close to one-third of respondents lied about

5 Steps To Take Before Retirement

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Are you planning to retire within the next 10 to 15 years?If so, are you ready to take retirement preparedness to the next level?

Retirement is no longer an abstract concept when you reach your 50s. It’s important to take a closer look at your financial plans now, while you have time to make any corrections. Consider these five steps to ensure the retirement of your dreams – or at least avoid the retirement of your nightmares.

1. Outline Your Retirement Goals – What do you really want to do when you retire? Buy a retirement home on the beach? Travel abroad? Start an expensive hobby? It’s time to figure out how to pay for those goals.

Lay out your primary retirement goals and estimate the major expenses associated with them. Place those expenses on a timeline spread throughout your retirement. You now have an estimate of how your cash flow needs will change because of your retirement plans.

2. Rethink Your Expenses –

Video: 3 Secrets To Using MoviePass

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Have you tried to take advantage of MoviePass’s incredibly low price to see the latest cinema releases? How did that work out for you? Many have reported issues with the popular service, but there is a way to come out ahead. Watch our exclusive video above to learn three tips that Professor MoneyTips Jeff Hoyt had to learn through (bad) experiences to ensure that you win with MoviePass.

If you want more credit to sign up for a movie or television service, check out our list of credit card offers.

Americans’ Financial Regrets

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Do you have any regrets in life? You’ve probably done a few things you wish you hadn’t, like adding sour milk to your coffee or washing your new red sweater with your good white shirts.

Those regrets can be painful, but the effects are short-lived. Financial regrets can have longer-lasting consequences – and, according to a recent survey from Student Loan Hero, 76% of Americans have some form of financial regret.

Most financial regrets come from the same basic principle – spending too much money instead of saving it.

In the past year, not saving enough was the top regret of 46% of survey respondents. Half of respondents regretted not saving more for retirement, and just over one-third would contribute some of their spending to a 401(k) plan or IRA if they c…

Less Than 1 In 3 Parents Teach Their Kids About Credit Scores

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Your kids are growing up fast. Soon, it will be time to have … the talk.

No, not that one. We’re referring to the talk about responsible use of credit. If you don’t drive home the importance of good credit practices while your children are young, they’re more likely to learn about credit the hard way – by racking up more debt than they can pay off.

A new survey by Chase suggests that many parents are not giving their children sufficient understanding of credit and how to use it wisely. The Chase Slate Credit Outlook found that while 56% of parents have talked to their children about money, only 32% of parents explained credit scores to them.

A greater percentage of parents (38%) encouraged their kids to get their first credit cards – thus, at least 6% of parents directed their children toward credit cards without giving them a full understanding of how they work.

When should you start a credit discussion with your children? According to Rod …

Americans’ Biggest Money Mistakes

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You’ve made some life decisions that you’ve regretted, and some of those decisions surely involve money. What sort of money mistakes have you made?

Don’t be shy about admitting your financial mistakes. According to the latest version of Finder.com’s annual America’s Biggest Money Mistakes survey, you have 192 million fellow Americans to keep you company. More than three-quarters (78.3%) of respondents claimed to have made a money mistake in their lifetime. We’re surprised that number isn’t closer to 100%!

As Finder.com Consumer Advocate Jennifer McDermott says, “It’s understandable that so many have made a money mistake in our lifetime – we’re only human! However, while a slip-up doesn’t need to derail our entire financial wellbeing, it’s important to recognize the triggers to make better choices in the future.”

What’s the most cited financial mistake? By far, the winner …

From $110 Million to Bankruptcy

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Antoine Walker had the world by the tail in 1996. He was coming off a NCAA championship season with the Kentucky Wildcats and was chosen by the Boston Celtics as the sixth pick overall in the 1996 draft. Fourteen years later, he declared bankruptcy with assets of $4.28 million and $12.74 million in liabilities. Walker had managed to blow through nearly $110 million.

Walker’s story is not unique. It’s been estimated that around 60% of NBA players end up broke within five years after retirement. Most go broke for the same reason — massive overspending.

Many NBA players feel obligated to take care of family and friends after they strike it rich, but they do so in extravagant and unsustainable ways, as Walker did. Determined to do right by his mother and five siblings, he built multi-million dollar houses for his entire family.

Walker certainly was not shy in spending on himself, either. He bought multiple expensive cars, including a $350,000 Maybach. Throw…