4 Out Of 5 Americans Lie For Money

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Have you ever lied for financial gain? The odds are strong that you’ve done it at least once. According to a new study from finder.com, almost 4 out of 5 Americans have admitted to lying for some type of financial gain – and many don’t feel guilty about their lies.

Over 2,000 U.S. adults were asked if they had committed any of the financial lies presented in a list, from the illegal to the merely unethical. A surprising 78% of respondents admitted to at least one of the transgressions. Assuming a random sample, the study implies that almost 193 million American adults have lied for financial gain at some point in their lives.

Over half of respondents had lied in two specific areas – pocketing found money that wasn’t theirs (56%) and accepting an undercharge or excess change without bringing it to a seller’s attention (52%).

Close to one-third of respondents lied about

5 Steps To Take Before Retirement

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Are you planning to retire within the next 10 to 15 years?If so, are you ready to take retirement preparedness to the next level?

Retirement is no longer an abstract concept when you reach your 50s. It’s important to take a closer look at your financial plans now, while you have time to make any corrections. Consider these five steps to ensure the retirement of your dreams – or at least avoid the retirement of your nightmares.

1. Outline Your Retirement Goals – What do you really want to do when you retire? Buy a retirement home on the beach? Travel abroad? Start an expensive hobby? It’s time to figure out how to pay for those goals.

Lay out your primary retirement goals and estimate the major expenses associated with them. Place those expenses on a timeline spread throughout your retirement. You now have an estimate of how your cash flow needs will change because of your retirement plans.

2. Rethink Your Expenses –

Card Cracking 101

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By Sandra Parsons

While Cardi B is topping the charts, “Card Cracking” is ruining some music fans’ lives. Rapper Young Ash and five others were recently indicted for running a card cracking ring that recruited accomplices through her Snapchat channel. Learn how card cracking works and how you can avoid falling victim to such a scam.

What is card cracking?

Card cracking is a type of financial fraud in which the fraudster promises easy money to entice regular people into sharing their debit card, PIN, and online banking credentials. The fraudster deposits bad checks (often online) and then quickly withdraws them from the ATM. They instruct their victim/accomplice to report the activity to their bank as unauthorized to get reimbursed for the loss once the checks bounce. The fraudster walks away with the withdrawn cash, and the accomplice gets a cut of the profits.

However, it doesn’t usually play out the way the accomplice t…

Get Your Money As Soon As You Earn It

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You’re in a cash-flow crunch again. An important bill is due, and you’ve earned the money to pay that bill – but it’s not payday yet. You’re on a two-week pay cycle and have to wait for another week or so before your money is available.

What are your options? Ask a friend or relative to loan you money for a few weeks. Take out a payday loan and pay painful interest rates. Make the payment late and run the risk of penalty fees and a drop in your credit score. Ask your employer for a payday advance. All these options can be embarrassing and unpleasant.

Many Americans take the payday loan approach – approximately twelve million each year, according to 2016 research from the Pew Charitable Trusts – paying a collective $9 billion in fees and interest charges.

Payday access apps like Earnin are designed to fill this cash-flow gap. As opposed to a payday advance …

Video: 3 Secrets To Using MoviePass

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Have you tried to take advantage of MoviePass’s incredibly low price to see the latest cinema releases? How did that work out for you? Many have reported issues with the popular service, but there is a way to come out ahead. Watch our exclusive video above to learn three tips that Professor MoneyTips Jeff Hoyt had to learn through (bad) experiences to ensure that you win with MoviePass.

If you want more credit to sign up for a movie or television service, check out our list of credit card offers.

Get Cash Back On Your Debit Cards!

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Prefer using debit cards over credit cards, but miss earning rewards? Some debit cards offer cash-back rewards – either as a straight points-based redemption program or as a perks-based program directed at purchases with specific merchants. You may have debit card cash-back benefits through a perks-based program and not even realize it.

Cardlytics is one of the largest of the perks-based programs, having paid over $200 million in cash-back rewards to debit card holders. They have relationships with over 2,000 financial institutions across America, including large banks such as Bank of America, PNC, SunTrust, and Regions.

Essentially, Cardlytics offers cash-back rewards programs through the banks’ online user interfaces in exchange for information on your spending habits. Their approach of targeted cash-back rewards allows you to easily redeem offers at merchants you al…

Americans’ Financial Regrets

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Do you have any regrets in life? You’ve probably done a few things you wish you hadn’t, like adding sour milk to your coffee or washing your new red sweater with your good white shirts.

Those regrets can be painful, but the effects are short-lived. Financial regrets can have longer-lasting consequences – and, according to a recent survey from Student Loan Hero, 76% of Americans have some form of financial regret.

Most financial regrets come from the same basic principle – spending too much money instead of saving it.

In the past year, not saving enough was the top regret of 46% of survey respondents. Half of respondents regretted not saving more for retirement, and just over one-third would contribute some of their spending to a 401(k) plan or IRA if they c…

Less Than 1 In 3 Parents Teach Their Kids About Credit Scores

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Your kids are growing up fast. Soon, it will be time to have … the talk.

No, not that one. We’re referring to the talk about responsible use of credit. If you don’t drive home the importance of good credit practices while your children are young, they’re more likely to learn about credit the hard way – by racking up more debt than they can pay off.

A new survey by Chase suggests that many parents are not giving their children sufficient understanding of credit and how to use it wisely. The Chase Slate Credit Outlook found that while 56% of parents have talked to their children about money, only 32% of parents explained credit scores to them.

A greater percentage of parents (38%) encouraged their kids to get their first credit cards – thus, at least 6% of parents directed their children toward credit cards without giving them a full understanding of how they work.

When should you start a credit discussion with your children? According to Rod …

Seniors And Affordable Transportation

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By Eric Olsen, Executive Director HELPS Nonprofit Law Firm

Affordable transportation is often a concern for senior citizens. Some seniors go without basics to make car payments they can’t afford for a car with little or no equity. Others need affordable replacement transportation but don’t have the income to finance a car. What are some options for these seniors?

I am the Executive Director of HELPS, a national charitable nonprofit law firm that educates lower-income seniors on how to maintain their financial independence. We regularly speak with seniors searching for answers to transportation problems. First let’s discuss options for buying a car, then what to do if you have an existing car payment you can’t afford.

Financing a car from a dealer might not be the best option or even possible for a senior with lower income. Dealers generally sell used cars “as …