4 Out Of 5 Americans Lie For Money

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Have you ever lied for financial gain? The odds are strong that you’ve done it at least once. According to a new study from finder.com, almost 4 out of 5 Americans have admitted to lying for some type of financial gain – and many don’t feel guilty about their lies.

Over 2,000 U.S. adults were asked if they had committed any of the financial lies presented in a list, from the illegal to the merely unethical. A surprising 78% of respondents admitted to at least one of the transgressions. Assuming a random sample, the study implies that almost 193 million American adults have lied for financial gain at some point in their lives.

Over half of respondents had lied in two specific areas – pocketing found money that wasn’t theirs (56%) and accepting an undercharge or excess change without bringing it to a seller’s attention (52%).

Close to one-third of respondents lied about

Mortgage Deduction Claims Will Drop More Than 50%

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Who wants simpler taxes? Most of us do, assuming we also keep more money in the process.

Starting in 2018, homeowners are more likely to have simpler tax returns – but they may need to make similar tax calculations to ensure a lower tax bill.

Tax simplification was part of the pitch to sell the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) to the American public. To help achieve this goal, Congress raised standard deductions and reduced or eliminated several itemized deductions with the TCJA to encourage filers to take the standard deduction. Taxes are much simpler if you don’t itemize, and there’s no reason to itemize if your standard deduction is greater than your collective itemized deductions.

The TCJA raised the standard deduction for married couples filing jointly to $24,000 (almost double the previous deduction of $12,700). The standard deduction for single filers rose…

Your Unpaid Student Loan Could Cost You Your Tax Refund

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You anticipated a large refund on your taxes to pay off some bills and put some money away in a rainy-day fund. Unfortunately, the money never showed up. What happened?

Your refund may have gone toward an unpaid bill selected by the government – your unpaid student loan.

Your federal student loan is considered to be in default if you haven’t made a payment in 270 days. When that happens, the federal government has the right to claim your tax refund as payment against the debt, in a process known as an administrative offset. In essence, the government isn’t giving any tax refunds back to you if you aren’t attempting to repay what you already owe the government.

If you’ve lost a tax refund to an offset, you aren’t alone. Student loan default rates are near 11%, giving the government plenty of offset targets. In fiscal 2017, the Treasury Department executed $2.6 billion in tax refund offsets on approximately 1.3 million

Refund Advance Loans And Refund Anticipation Checks 101

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Are you counting on your tax refund to pay off bills? You may need the cash before your refund arrives.

The IRS website states that typical refunds take less than 21 calendar days if you e-filed your return. However, if you are claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) your refund may be delayed further.

Tax preparers may offer a solution in the form of refund advance loans (RALs) and refund anticipation checks (RACs). What’s the difference between the two, and is either one right for you?

Refund advance loans are just what they sound like – a loan issued by a lender for the amount of your anticipated tax refund. You are loaned the money up front and your refund is used against the loan balance.

Predatory, older-style RALs were basically eliminated by rule changes in 2010 and 2012 due to high interest rates and other charge…